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Slow-moving Sally drenches southeast states

Video Credit: Reuters - Politics
Published on September 17, 2020 - Duration: 01:52s

Slow-moving Sally drenches southeast states

[NFA] Storm Sally on Thursday dumped more than a foot of rain on parts of Alabama, Florida and Georgia, killed at least one person, washed out bridges and roads and left hundreds of thousands without power.

This report produced by Jillian Kitchener.

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Slow-moving Sally drenches southeast states

“It’s a lot more water than I think I expected.” (FLASH) “This has been a lot worse than we thought it would be.

I mean, you can't see where the sound starts or ends.

It’s crazy.” The remnants of Hurricane Sally on Thursday dumped more than a foot of rain on parts of Alabama, Florida and Georgia, killed at least one person, washed out bridges and roads and left hundreds of thousands without power.

Pensacola, Florida saw up to 5 feet of flooding.

In Alabama - boats washed ashore and flooding made many roads impassable.

Governor Kay Ivey on Thursday said it would take days to know the full devastation.

“Many locals have said that this slow-moving storm has perhaps the biggest impact of any storm we've ever seen.

And keep in mind, this area of the state remembers all too well the impact of Ivan in 2004 and Frederic in 1979." Sally - now a tropical depression - is not the most powerful storm to batter the U.S. Gulf Coast in recent memory.

It hit as a Category 2 storm.

But its glacial pace is becoming a regular feature of massive weather systems - like Hurricane Harvey in 2017 - that parked over Houston and dumped rain that had to be measured in feet instead of inches.

At one point during its approach, Sally was moving at a mere 2 miles per hour.

The connection between the slow pace of some storms and climate change is not yet settled.

But there is evidence - according to Jim Kossin, climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - that a warming Arctic weakens the winds that can help move a hurricane along.

Some 465,000 homes and businesses in Alabama, Georgia and Florida remained on Thursday without power.

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Kay Ivey

54th Governor of Alabama


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