🇦🇺

After NZ shootings, a focus on Trump's speech

Credit: Reuters Studio
Published on March 17, 2019 - Duration: 03:01s

After NZ shootings, a focus on Trump's speech

The White House on Sunday rejected any attempt to link the U.S. president or his rhetoric to a shooter who killed 50 people in two New Zealand mosques.

Linda So reports.

Advertisement

After NZ shootings, a focus on Trump's speech

(SOUNDBITE) (English) U.S. DEMOCRATIC SENATOR TIM KAINE (VA), SAYING: "We have to confront the fact that there is a rise in white supremacy, anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim attitudes." Massacres at two New Zealand mosques by a suspected white supremacist has focused attention on the threat of far-right terrorism.

And the United States has seen a rise in racist and right-wing extremist violence.

In October, a gunman murdered eleven people inside a Pittsburgh synagogue.

In 2017 a suspected White Nationalist rammed his car into a group of anti-racist protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, killing a woman.

In January, the Anti-Defamation League released a report that said right-wing extremists killed more people in the U.S. in 2018 than any year since the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995.

But asked on Friday if he saw white nationalism as a rising threat, U.S. president Donald Trump said this: (SOUNDBITE) (English) U.S. PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP SAYING: "I don't really.

I think its a small group of people that have very, very serious problems. I guess if you look at what happened in New Zealand, perhaps that's the case.

I don't know enough about it yet.

They are just learning about the person and the people involved.

But it's certainly a terrible thing." And his comments condemning the New Zealand attack make no mention of the racism and Islamophobia that may have motivated the murders.

The accused New Zealand gunman praised Trump in a manifesto as “a symbol of renewed white identity and common purpose.” (SOUNDBITE) (English) CBS NEWS JOURNALIST MARGARET BRENNAN, SAYING: "Why minimize it?

Why not specifically address white supremacy?" Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney dismissed criticism of the president's response.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) ACTING WHITE HOUSE CHIEF OF STAFF MICK MULVANEY, SAYING: "I want to push back against this idea that every time bad happens everywhere around the world, folks who don't like Donald Trump seem to blame it on Donald Trump." But critics pointed to Trump's call on the campaign to ban Muslims from entering America: (SOUNDBITE) (English) REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE DONALD TRUMP SAYING (December 7, 2015) "-a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States." And his defense of white supremacists at the rally in Virginia that turned deadly in 2017: (SOUNDBITE) (English) REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE DONALD TRUMP SAYING (August 15, 2017) "You have some very bad people in that group.

But you also had people that were very fine people, on both sides." (SOUNDBITE) (English) ACTING WHITE HOUSE CHIEF OF STAFF MICK MULVANEY, SAYING: "I hear when folks say, 'oh, Donald Trump said this during the campaign.'

Look at what we've done while we've been here.

I don't think anybody could say that the president is anti-Muslim." (SOUNDBITE) (English) U.S. DEMOCRATIC SENATOR TIM KAINE (VA), SAYING: "The president uses language, often that's very similar to the language used by these bigots and racists.

" Democratic Senator Tim Kaine on Sunday told CBS News that Trump repeatedly calls Central American migrants "invaders." (SOUNDBITE) (English) U.S. DEMOCRATIC SENATOR TIM KAINE (VA), SAYING: "Which was exactly the same phrase that the shooter in New Zealand used to characterize the Muslims he was attacking." (SOUNDBITE) (English) U.S. PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP SAYING (March 15, 2019): "We're on track for a million illegal aliens to rush our borders--people hate the word invasion but that's what it is." (SOUNDBITE) (English) U.S. PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP SAYING (November 1, 2018): "This is an invasion." (SOUNDBITE) (English) U.S. PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP SAYING (November 4, 2018): "That's an invasion." (SOUNDBITE) (English) U.S. PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP SAYING (January 24, 2019): "Because this is a virtual invasion." The White House rejected any connection between the administration and the attack.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) ACTING WHITE HOUSE CHIEF OF STAFF MICK MULVANEY, SAYING: "I disagree that there's a causal link between Donald Trump being president and something like this happening in New Zealand."

You are here

You might like